Deborah Bloom

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The finale to the St. Louis Symphony’s subscription season included a number of thunderous ovations, which were fitting for the conclusion to a stellar season of music. The Planets brought down the house, which is just what the piece was made for.

Debbie Bloom and Jooyeon Kong in the classroom
Debbie Bloom and Jooyeon Kong in the classroom

One of the most poignant ovations was for second violinist Deborah Bloom, who retires at the end of this season. After intermission David Robertson gave a warm testimonial of Debbie’s decades of service to the orchestra, with a special mention of the work she has done in Education and Community Programs. I’ve had the great good fortune to observe Debbie in the classroom, presenting her “Mole Music” program, which is something of a music-in-the-schools classic. In that tale, Mole takes up the violin and changes his life and the lives of others. I’ve seen students rapt by Debbie’s playing and her storytelling. And I’ve seen her just as attentive to the students’ questions and ideas.

Debbie received a generous standing ovation from an SRO Powell Hall, for the great music made and shared, and the lives that have been changed through the playing, the teaching and the listening.

 

Secrets to a Lasting Musical Marriage

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Carson, ChrisBloom, Debbie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Second violinist Deborah Bloom and double bassist Chris Carson have been in the orchestra together for 41 seasons. Debbie started a year before Chris. They’ve been married that whole time too, and after two grown children and one new grandson later, I asked Debbie if she had advice for other married couples in the orchestra. Debbie and Chris been going to work together and working for the same company and in the same office–the Powell Hall stage–since the mid-’70s. How have they made it work?

“It helps if you can be across the stage from each other,” Debbie suggests. “Try to work that out.”