Golden Anniversary Gift

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An ensemble of about a dozen St. Louis Symphony musicians were not done with their music-making day after the Lindenwood University concert on Sunday afternoon. They made their way to Ferguson and the Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church for a Symphony Where You Worship concert. Featured on the program was music by Symphony violist Chris Woehr, who gives more and more of his time to composing each season.

Rehearsal at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church in Ferguson
Rehearsal at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church in Ferguson

The evening included two pieces from Woehr’s growing body of work, the premiere performance of The Five Seasons, featuring Jennifer Nitchman on flute, and The Bartholomew Concerto, featuring Phil Ross on oboe and a storyline by Dr. Seuss. Woehr conducted.

Phil Ross and company rehearse "The Bartholomew Concerto."
Phil Ross and company rehearse “The Bartholomew Concerto.”

The concert also served to celebrate the 50th anniversary of longtime St. Louis Symphony fans Maeve and Dave Horton. They commissioned The Five Seasons from Woehr, a nice 50-year gift to themselves, their community, and to music.

Maeve and David Horton with Chris Woehr
Maeve and David Horton with Chris Woehr

Keep It Simple

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After reading the promotional material for Nike’s new Kobe Bryant “Beethoven” shoe (see Thursday’s post), and especially trying to parse a sentence such as, “The grey color of this colorway represents Beethoven’s timeless quality,” I was reminded of a basic copy-writing rule: keep it simple.

Philip Ross
Philip Ross

For example, I asked oboist Phil Ross about his hot picks for the upcoming season. He needed to look no further than the program for Opening Weekend: David Robertson conducting Brahms’ Piano Concerto No. 1 with Yefim Bronfman, Vaughan Williams’ The Lark Ascending with Erin Schreiber, and Nielsen’s Symphony No. 4, “The Inextinguishable.” Ross wrote: “Well, the first concert looks pretty damn good. I’d pay good money to hear each piece, let alone all on one program!”

Single tickets go on sale Monday.  Pay your good money for some pretty damn good concerts. You can’t go wrong. It’s simple.