Self Present and Selves Past

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The blessings of the office speakers: Scott Andrews rehearsed Pierre Boulez’s Dialogue de l’ombre double (Dialogue of the Double Shadow), a piece for clarinet and live electronics, on the Powell Hall stage Friday afternoon. It’s a composition of sonic wonder. Andrews plays live along with recordings of himself. The recordings were made a few years ago, and are constant, but Andrews’ live musicianship is always changing. He told me it had the feeling of performing with past selves. His description made me think of Arthur Rimbaud’s famous phrase Je est un autre: “I is someone else.”

Principal Clarinet Scott Andrews
Principal Clarinet Scott Andrews

But for all that Dialogue of the Double Shadow may make you and I think, or marvel at the technosound strategies, it is the magic and mystery it leaves behind when it is done that is most compelling. A haunting. These sounds you’ve heard–you will never hear them again.

Pride

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Karin Bliznik sent an email following the master class she gave with section mates Mike Walk and Carrie Schafer at the International Trumpet Guild Conference in Columbus, Ohio. One word: “Success!”

Here she is with her undergrad teacher at Boston University, Professor Terry Everson, in his Facebook post.

karinThe St. Louis Symphony Youth Orchestra played a terrific concert Saturday evening, the finale to an extraordinary season. You can see the pride in St. Louis Symphony Principal Clarinet Scott Andrews’ face. He is YO Concerto Competition Winner Aleksis Martin’s coach, and they are backstage after Aleskis’ spellbinding performance of Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto. Aleksis looks proud, exhausted and relieved.

Scott Andrews and  Aleksis Martin backstage at Powell Hall
Scott Andrews and Aleksis Martin backstage at Powell Hall

The Symphony’s Tina Ward went clarinet against light saber in the Powell foyer. With the orchestra performing the music of John Williams and Richard Strauss and other otherworldy pieces for the Lost in Space show, everybody won.

tina saber

Let’s Dance

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Mozart loved to dance, and it is hard not to find a dance theme in his music. So it is appropriate that Lutoslawksi’s Dance Preludes figures as an introduction to the Mozart Piano Concerto No. 17 in G major, which follows. Principal Clarinet Scott Andrews, who solos in the Lutoslawski, shares insights into the work in this week’s video blog.

Almost Dancing

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Scott Andrews rehearsed the rocking, jaunty, bluesy, jazzy Lutoslawski Dance Preludes with David Robertson and the orchestra on Thursday afternoon. Scott told me it’s music that feels like the dance is just about to happen–a perfect concert opening, especially with Mozart Piano Concerto No. 17 in G major, played by Richard Goode, right after.

Scott Andrews
Scott Andrews